One summer, the artist was given a little crow which she raised and tamed. That's how her friends remembered her: tall and slender with a long black braid, and a crow sitting on her shoulder.

Follow the path of Lyubov Panchenko, immersing yourself
in her life and art.
Lyubov Panchenko (1938)
Soul is in the canvases
Biography
Childhood
Childhood
Lyubov Panchenko is a living legend of Ukrainian national art. She was born in 1938 in a village near Kyiv. Her parents never approved of her passion for drawing. As a child, Lyuba was slapped on the hands if she took a pencil. The girl did not receive help from her family when she was studying at an art college, so she ate poorly and her health suffered.
Multifaceted activities
Multifaceted activities
Panchenko found her true calling by becoming a fashion designer. She created sketches of clothes, decorative paintings, fabric applications, graphics, and paintings. The embroidery designs by Lyubov Panchenko were published by the main women's magazine of Ukraine at the time, "Soviet Woman." These patterns were then copied by masters throughout the country.

She always supported the Ukrainian language and culture. Panchenko painted pysanky (easter eggs), embroidered national costumes for choirs, and raised money to help political prisoners serving sentences for "Anti-Soviet Agitation and Propaganda." With her participation, the tradition of Christmas caroling and Ukrainian vertep (nativity scene) was revived in Kyiv.

In 1964, Alla Horska, Lyudmyla Semykina, and Halyna Sevruk created a stained glass window "Shevchenko. Mother" at the Kyiv University. Around the same time, Panchenko made sketches of Ukrainian "rushnyk" (towels embroidered with national symbols) and decorated the walls of the Taras Shevchenko Museum in Kyiv.
Soul is in
the canvases
Soul is in
the canvases
In all of Panchenko's works, regardless of the medium, there are Ukrainian motifs. She knows folk art well and relies on it in her own work. In particular, she intertwines national ornaments in drawings and clothing design.

The fate of Lyubov has been dramatic. In Soviet times, her works were not exhibited nor published. She only survived by making embroidery. Today, the artist's works can be seen in the private collections of her friends as well as in the Museum of the Sixtiers in Kyiv.
Childhood
Childhood
Lyubov Panchenko is a living legend of Ukrainian national art. She was born in 1938 in a village near Kyiv. Her parents never approved of her passion for drawing. As a child, Lyuba was slapped on the hands if she took a pencil. The girl did not receive help from her family when she was studying at an art college, so she ate poorly and her health suffered.
Multifaceted activities
Multifaceted activities
Panchenko found her true calling by becoming a fashion designer. She created sketches of clothes, decorative paintings, fabric applications, graphics, and paintings. The embroidery designs by Lyubov Panchenko were published by the main women's magazine of Ukraine at the time, "Soviet Woman." These patterns were then copied by masters throughout the country.

She always supported the Ukrainian language and culture. Panchenko painted pysanky (easter eggs), embroidered national costumes for choirs, and raised money to help political prisoners serving sentences for "Anti-Soviet Agitation and Propaganda." With her participation, the tradition of Christmas caroling and Ukrainian vertep (nativity scene) was revived in Kyiv.

In 1964, Alla Horska, Lyudmyla Semykina, and Halyna Sevruk created a stained glass window "Shevchenko. Mother" at the Kyiv University. Around the same time, Panchenko made sketches of Ukrainian "rushnyk" (towels embroidered with national symbols) and decorated the walls of the Taras Shevchenko Museum in Kyiv.
Soul is in
the canvases
Soul is in
the canvases
In all of Panchenko's works, regardless of the medium, there are Ukrainian motifs. She knows folk art well and relies on it in her own work. In particular, she intertwines national ornaments in drawings and clothing design.

The fate of Lyubov has been dramatic. In Soviet times, her works were not exhibited nor published. She only survived by making embroidery. Today, the artist's works can be seen in the private collections of her friends as well as in the Museum of the Sixtiers in Kyiv.
Art
"Politics was imposed on me all my life, and
I was far from it. But I always and everywhere spoke Ukrainian."
Lyubov Panchenko
Lyubov Panchenko
An unexpected meeting
 At the first guli
Mother's fairy tale
Poplar
 Lily
 Cossack Mamay
Motherhood
 Spring singing
Girl
Lyubov Panchenko
Into the world
Kupala
In starry space
Family
Ornament
 Spring singing
Beast
Cow
Sketch of embroidery
Sketch of a costume
Sketch of a Ukrainian costume
2020
Lyubov Panchenko's designer clothing may be
the next hot thing for Kyiv fashionistas.
Suite and headdress by Lyubov Panchenko
Suite and headdress by Lyubov Panchenko
Suite and headdress by Lyubov Panchenko
Headdress, ribbon and belt by Lyubov Panchenko
Belt by Lyubov Panchenko
Belt by Lyubov Panchenko
Belts by Lyubov Panchenko
Headdress and ribbon by Lyubov Panchenko
Suite and headdress by Lyubov Panchenko
Headdress by Lyubov Panchenko
Belt by Lyubov Panchenko
Typical sixties apartment interior
Typical sixties apartment interior
Photo archive
Commissioned by the Ukrainian Institute for the Ukraine Everywhere programme
60s.treasures@gmail.com
© Copyright 2020 • All right reserved • Ukrainian Animation Association • Ukrainian Institute
Art
Art
Art
Art
Art